Data

AACSB International maintains the most comprehensive database on business schools in the world. The tables, charts, and references herein are designed to address frequent data requests, and provide a general overview of global management education.


Frequently Requested Data

 

Did you know?

11,532 total collaborations were reported in the 2014–15 Collaborations Survey. The 2015–16 Collaborations Survey is now open for participation. Add your input today!


Featured Data

Female Faculty Growth


Members Only Financial Toolkit 

The Financial Toolkit offers a bevy of tools, information, and resources designed for business school deans, chief financial officers, and others to ensure the financial well-being of their institutions.

> View More


Global Salary Survey

The 2015-2016 Global Salary Survey Report is now available.

> 2015-2016 Executive Summary
> Executive Summaries from Previous Years
> Member Login: DataDirect Custom Salary Reports


2016 Business School Data Guide

Data Trends CoverSelected highlights compiled annually in a downloadable pocket guide.

> 2016 Guide
> Previous Year Guides


Using AACSB Data: A Case Guide

Within this recently released case guide, you will find five examples of use scenarios for DataDirect. Each case provides a high-level look at some of the functions available to members and those who participate in AACSB’s annual surveys.

> Download the guide


Stay Current with the Latest Posts from the AACSB Data & Research Blog

The Effect (Or Not) of Institutional Control on Starting Salaries
by Colin Nelson

By far one of the most popular queries we here at AACSB receive is regarding information about how a degree from an AACSB-accredited school contributes to the career of those who receive it. As we prepare to release the data from the 2015-16 iteration of the AACSB BSQ Employment Module survey, I thought I might treat our readers to a preview of the data that can help to shed light on that question.
> Read More 

Tenure Trends in Full-time Faculty
by Colin Nelson

Much has been said (or misstated) about systems of academic tenure in higher education. One of the more popular narratives is that tenure as an established practice is on its way out, for better or for worse. Since AACSB International tracks the numbers of full-time faculty who are tenured, tenure-track, or non-tenure-track in the annual Business School Questionnaire (BSQ), I thought it might be instructive to examine trends over time to see if our data bear out the popular narrative.
> Read More